Rhubarb and Dumplings

Print Print
Like this post? Tell your friends!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr

rhubarb

Rhubarb and Dumplings

Gluten-free, lactose-free, FODMAP friendly

Prep time: 35 mins

As I write this in April, my rhubarb plant is unfurling a few leaves to brave the last frosts and drinking up its spring fertilizing. Rhubarb was called “pie plant” by settlers in this part of the USA. It’s easy to grow and freeze* even in Zone 4, and it’s FODMAP friendly.

I bought some gluten-free Bisquick baking mix** to test, and the Betty Crocker website suggested using it for chicken and dumplings. I found the dumplings too sweet, foamy, and delicate to go atop chicken soup, but … brainstorm! … perfect for a dessert. Besides, last year’s rhubarb needed to depart the freezer.

While the dumplings cook, so does the rhubarb. It’s delicious, and it keeps surprisingly well.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 cups fresh or frozen rhubarb stems, cut in 1” slices
  • (Optional: replace 1 cup rhubarb with sliced strawberries)
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ cup sugar (I use half dextrose)
  • ¾ cup Bisquick Gluten Free baking mix
  • 1/3 cup plain, unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 Tbsp extra-light olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • Optional: another 2-4 Tbsp sugar or dextrose

Instructions

  1. Stir rhubarb, water, and sugar or sugars in saucepan and bring to a gentle boil.
  2. While the mixture heats, mix the GF Bisquick, almond milk, oil, and egg (and optional extra sugar, if you want it) with a fork in a small bowl.
  3. When rhubarb mixture starts to bubble, drop dough by six rounded tablespoonfuls onto the top of the mixture. Turn down the heat and cook uncovered 10 minutes. Keep it just barely bubbling.
  4. Turn the heat even lower, cover the pan and cook 15 minutes more.
  5. Let cool slightly, uncovered, in pan. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

Cooking for One:

This keeps surprisingly well for several days. Refrigerate; remove a portion at a time and warm it slightly in microwave.

*About harvesting and freezing rhubarb: Pull stems sharply so they come off at the plant’s base without breaking. DO NOT EAT RHUBARB LEAVES, which are poisonous! Trim them off, as well as the ugly bit at the base of the stem, with a sharp knife. If your rhubarb plant is more than 3 years old you may harvest as much as you like, but be gracious the first two years while it builds its root system.

Once your stems are indoors, wash them under running water, cut in 1” chunks, slip them into a freezer container or bag, and pop them in the freezer. THAT’S ALL. They’ll keep a year in there. Food doesn’t come much easier.

**GF Bisquick also makes excellent waffles.

Like this post? Tell your friends!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.